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Our Church Icons
These icons were "written" in the authentic and ancient Orthodox Christian tradition by Fr. Theodore Jurewicz, Master Iconographer. They were blessed by Metropolitan Theodosius and Archbishop Herman during the Divine Liturgy on October 18, 1998, as we celebrated our 35th anniversary.

If you would like to learn more about these icons, a booklet containing color photographs of all the icons, as well as a detailed explaination of each as written by John R. Barns, our parishioner and iconologist, can be purchased. Please e-mail us for more information.

 
Christ the Pantocrator
Christ the Pantocrator
Christ the Pantocrator
"And behold, I am coming quickly, and My reward is with Me, to give every man according as his work shall be. I am Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the End, the First and the Last.Revelations 22:12:13.

This powerful circular image of Christ depicts Him as The Pantocrator, or all sovereign, watching over His creation as ruler and judge.

 
The Iconostasis
The Iconostasis
The Iconostasis
The iconostasis is a wall of icons that defines and separates the sanctuary from the nave or main body of the church.  It could be described as the most dominant interior architectural feature of an Eastern Orthodox Christian church.

 
The Wedding at Cana
The Wedding at Cana
The Wedding at Cana
This icon depicts the marriage feast where Christ performed His first miracle, that of turning water into fine wine. The bridal couple are shown wearing crowns, a tradition repeated in today's Orthodox wedding service.
The Rising of Lazarus
The Rising of Lazarus
The Rising of Lazarus
Christ commands His friend Lazarus to come forth after three days in the tomb. After his miraculous resurrection, St. Lazarus took refuge in Cyprus where, according to Church tradition, he was consecrated bishop by Sts. Paul and Barnabas.

 
The Deisis
The Deisis
The Deisis
"Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the Kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world."  St. Matthew 25:34.

The subject of this icon is the Second Coming with Christ as judge inviting all to their reward. The word Deisis is of Greek origin meaning prayer and petition.

 
The Resurrection of Christ
The Resurrection of Christ
The Resurrection of Christ
Christ is shown tenderly pulling our ancestral parents, Adam and Eve, from their tombs.  Through His resurrection, Christ has shattered the gates of hell and scattered the chains and locks that bind mankind.
The Crucifixion of the Lord
The Crucifixion of the Lord
The Crucifixion of the Lord
"...and there was darkness all over the earth..."  St. Luke 23:44.

Crucifixion was a cruel method of execution but one that the Lord willingly endured for mankind.  Christ is shown dead in this icon to emphasize His humanity.  The cross symbolizes the burdens we all must carry and has become the predominant symbol of Christianity.

 
The Holy Eucharist
The Holy Eucharist
The Holy Eucharist
This icon does not depict an event from the life of Christ or His apostles. Rather, it represents the timeless, eternal, and mystical event being celebrated celestially. The Eucharist is not restricted to a particular time or place.

 
Christ and the Children
Christ and the Children
Christ and the Children
Christ rebuked the disciples for preventing the little children from coming to Him. Tradition states that the curly headed child on His lap is Ignatius, the future Bishop of Antioch and future martyr.
Entry Into Jerusalem
Entry Into Jerusalem
Entry Into Jerusalem
Jesus triumphantly entered Jerusalem after the Rising of Lazarus. The adults greet the Messiah with green branches while the children spread garments on the ground. The Entry into Jerusalem is one of the great feasts of the church and is recorded in all four gospels.

 
The Dormition
The Dormition
The Dormition
The Dormition of the Theotokos is one of the twelve great feast days. Located on the west wall of our church, this icon represents the peaceful death of the Theotokos.  We view this icon as we leave the church.  It is a gentle reminder that we all pray for "A Christian ending to our life: painless, blameless, and peaceful".
The Wall of Saints
The Wall of Saints
The Wall of Saints
The Wall of Saints consists of the following: St. Romanos, the Melodist; St. Jacob Netsvetov, Enlightener of the People of Alaska; Holy Hieromartyr Juvenal of Alaska and Holy Martyr Peter the Aleut; Holy Hierarch John, Archbishop of Shanghai and San Francisco; Holy Hierarch Tikhon of Moscow; Holy Priest Martyr John of Chicago; Holy Priest Martyr Alexander of New York City; Holy Blessed Xenia of St. Petersburg; Holy Hierarch Theophan the Recluse; Holy Righteous Alexis of Wilkes-Barre; Holy Priest Martyr Maksym of Carpatho-Rus; and Holy Hierarch Nicholas of South Canaan.

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